Monty Python watch

Watch Monty Python's Flying Circus Online: Watch full length episodes, video clips, highlights and more. Monty Python's Flying Circus 1969 TV-14 4 Seasons British TV Comedies The Monty Python players make their mark with a winning mix of wit, ingenuity and brilliant timing -- and a penchant for mockery and cross-dressing. Monty Python fans will enjoy owning a watch based on a Monty Python sketch. The Monty Python Ministry of Silly Walks Watch is perfect for fans of the show and just as silly. Now you can tell time while John Cleese does his silly walk. Telling time is fun again. Obviously it makes a nice gift, but The official online home for all things Monty Python. Pages of everything you’ll ever need to know about Monty Python and their movies, TV shows, books, live stage shows, apps and latest projects, as well as exclusive videos, news and a Fanwall where all your #montypython content will live. Also, find information about the individual Pythons - Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric ... 10 essential Monty Python episodes to watch now that the show's on Netflix Updated Jan 29, 2019; Posted Oct 10, 2018 The Monty Python crew lasted only four seasons but have left an indelible mark ... Monty Python's channel, the place to watch all videos, playlists, and live streams by Monty Python on dailymotion The Monty Python comedy clan skewers King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table as they quest far and wide for the Holy Grail. Starring: Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Eric Idle Watch all you want for free. STARZ delivers exclusive original series and the best Hollywood hits. Find previews for action, drama, romance, comedy, fantasy, science-fiction, family, adventure, horror films and more! 'Monty Python and the Holy Grail' is currently available to rent, purchase, or stream via subscription on Google Play, YouTube, Netflix, Amazon, FuboTV, and iTunes . Stream & Watch Online Powered ... Monty Python Lyrics; The Rutles Lyrics; Sounds . Holy Grail. Holy Grail Sounds Part 1; Holy Grail Sounds Part 2; Holy Grail Sounds Part 3; Holy Grail Sounds Part 4; Life of Brian. Life of Brian Sounds Part 1; Life of Brian Sounds Part 2; Hollywood Bowl Sounds; Meaning of Life Sounds; Flying Circus. Flying Circus Sounds Part 1; Flying Circus ...

How to Stay Nerdy

2014.10.08 19:10 NatetheNerdarch How to Stay Nerdy

The Nerdarchy, when power and authority is given to the most knowledgeable and nerdy of a group. The Nerdarchy and how to stay nerdy is all about supplying the reddit community with data and discourse to assist them in achieving that lofty throne. We do this by being a resource for those interested in games (analog and digital), nerdy ideals, media of the nerd-kind, and philosophies that help nerds to nerd-up.
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2012.03.25 11:18 100101 cat can.conf grep "has"

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2018.04.01 12:32 guccibananabricks StupIDPol: Marxist critique of essentialism

Subreddit primarily focused on critiquing identity politics from a Marxist perspective.
[link]


2020.09.25 19:49 NineInTheMoon 23/M/Sweden - Looking for nerdy friend with similar interests. Let's say, music, games, movies, humor, thoughts, ideas. You know never know, it's endless exploration.

I am a 23 year old lad from Sweden. I've been clearing out my friends list as either we've drifted a part, or been toxic or we just haven't suited each other. So looking to make good friends to talk with. What I am looking for is longer term friendship. Some individuals who has the ability to keep a conversation for a longer time and has at least some interests, studies oand work. Genuine individuals to talk with and get to know better platonically and to explore the world with. Like seeing where things go. I feel it would be nice to meet someone to build a connection with so to say.
Who am I:
This I do in my spare time and stuffs I like:
*What I’m looking for: * - You can be any gender, preferably in Europe since of time zones. I'll give you
So if you found this post interesting and would like to get to know each other more, why not send me send me a message haha and also maybe send me a song you like. I wouldn't mind talking on whatsapp/Discord as well :)
submitted by NineInTheMoon to MakeNewFriendsHere [link] [comments]


2020.09.25 14:47 SomeGuy0793 27 [M4F] New York/Northeastern USA

Hi there!
I’m a professional musician who has spent most of the past seven years on the road, both domestically and internationally. The pandemic has completely changed things, so I’ve been home for the past 6 ½ months.
I love comedy - standup, sitcoms, movies. I’m a huge Mel Brooks and Monty Python fan.
I am a massive Disney fan, particularly of the parks. I am an Annual Passholder at Walt Disney World and also try to go to Disneyland at least once a year. I visited Disneyland Paris several years ago, and I’d love to take a trip to all of the parks in Asia at some point in the near future as well.
I’m also very into roller coasters.
I’m a very big baseball fan, particularly of the Mets. I watch every game I can, and in more normal times, I try to go to 6-10 games a season.
I’m a staunch Democrat.
I rarely drink; I do not smoke or use drugs.
I am not a gamer.
As far as physical appearance, I’m 5’ 11 ½”, brown hair, brown eyes, and I wear glasses. I frequently grow my beard out, though it’s a bit short right now. I’ve gained a bunch of weight since I’ve been off the road; I’m trying very hard to lose it.
I would be more than happy to send a picture or two in exchange for one of you.
I’m looking for a woman who is as passionate about her career as I am mine, enjoys traveling, is extremely kind, understanding, and caring, and has a great sense of humor. It’d be great to have a lot of similar interests, of course. Someone within a few hours' drive would be ideal.
Hope to hear from you soon!
submitted by SomeGuy0793 to r4r [link] [comments]


2020.09.25 14:02 LordChozo Hindsight is 2020: #6 - Entangled

from A Trick of the Tail, 1976
Listen to it here!
I have sleep apnea. If you haven’t heard of this condition, it essentially means your body occasionally stops breathing altogether during sleep, causing you to “wake up” so you can begin breathing again. These stops and starts usually aren’t noticed consciously, but can be characterized by things like tossing and turning, and of course snoring. My case is relatively mild as these things go, but it is legitimate sleep apnea all the same. This isn’t mere assumption either; I’ve actually done a sleep study at a center and been officially diagnosed.
That was a particularly strange night, as I recall. For one thing, it was the first night I’d ever spent away from my wife since we had been wed a couple years earlier: a sweet but disappointing footnote in our marital history. But mainly it was the fact that my face had to be covered in sensors, which were affixed with a kind of thick paste substance. I had wires and goop all over, was laid down on a fairly spartan cot with a pillow of questionable make, surrounded by lights turned low but not all the way off, with a live camera watching every movement and listening to every sound I made. I always sleep on my side; they told me I had to lay on my back; else the sensors might not work properly. “What if I have to go to the bathroom?” “Well, you’ll need to unplug all these wires, take these monitors with you, do what you need to do, then come back in and we’ll hook you up again.”
I was fairly confident I suffered from sleep apnea going into that study, but was there ever any doubt I’d come out of it with a firm diagnosis? How could anyone get their best sleep under conditions like that? I probably managed a combined three hours that night, which was enough for them to tell me I officially had a problem. They recommended I order a CPAP machine, which is a device that you hook onto your face before bed every night that blows air into your throat so you don’t wake up due to temporary airway collapse. It is not a cure; it is a solution that only works if you are actively using it, and therefore a chronic sufferer of sleep apnea who opts for this treatment method must use it every night for the rest of his or her life. If you think this sounds uncomfortable and onerous, you’re not alone: half of all CPAP users quit within the first year of using the device because for them the solution to the apnea proves worse than the apnea itself.
I also wasn’t too keen on sticking a reversed vacuum onto my face every night, so I talked to my dentist, who recommended a certain oral appliance that he was confident would be effective for a condition as mild as mine. But then we hit a snag of insurance coverage, and that dragged on, and eventually the matter was forgotten entirely. It’s now years later and I still haven’t followed up on either of these potential options. I probably should, but my reality just kind of is what it is, you know what I mean? I am always tired. Like anyone, a particularly bad night can send me into deeper fatigue, but I don’t have a “well-rested” baseline. Not really. It’s just varying levels of functional. But see, that’s all I know. It’s all I’ve ever known. I can’t remember ever feeling one hundred percent, fully energized in a healthy way like some people talk about, so I can’t miss it. My body’s adapted to these energy levels on a permanent basis; I’ll yawn all day but I’ll make it through, no worries.
But it does mean that when I get exhausted, I get really exhausted. Some nights I just crash hard, no matter what I’d rather be doing. I’m always tired, but if I tell you I’m feeling tired, I’m probably almost gone. And there are activities that prove especially draining. Not physical ones, surprisingly; exercise doesn’t wear me down that much. It’s the mental side of things that gets me. A day at the office juggling five different meetings for five different clients on five different subjects? That kind of rapid gear switching is a recipe for complete burnout when I finish the day. Writing a giant Reddit post about “Heathaze” with everything that act entails? Man, that’s exhausting work. Coming back to the computer a few hours later to write one for “Entangled” too? I don’t know how I can summon the mental energy to pull that off.
So I get what Steve Hackett means when he says that after writing and recording his first solo album Voyage of the Acolyte, he was totally spent.
Steve: My first memory [of the Trick of the Tail writing sessions] was of day one of rehearsal, of being very tired. As if I'd just given birth once and I was required to come up with another baby very quickly! 1
Creating things is hard, man. Whatever your art, whatever your method, it’s never easy to make something out of nothing. Sometimes you’re flush with ideas, but even then you’ve got to deal with refining them, assembling them, filling in any gaps, and so forth. That’s why when you hear songwriters talking about how easy a song was to write, it’s almost always a surprise to them. They know their own talent and expertise, so why should they be shocked that this song came together so well? Because that’s not normal. Usually the ideas are more scattered and take something else to fully form.
Steve: What I used to do was probably throw in a few riffs and licks rather than whole songs. Although there was “Entangled” and there was “Los Endos” and the outro of “Dance on a Volcano”, those sort of things, you know. Sort of kick in with those ideas. 2
This is even true for Tony Banks, who was working just as hard at writing songs as Steve, but didn’t have a solo album outlet siphoning them off. As a result…
Tony: I came in [to the Trick of the Tail sessions] perhaps with the most complete songs. Mike came in with sections, as did Steve, and as it happened the bits we used to sort of finish them off were my bits, so I ended up being credited on every track on this album. Which was sort of quite funny. 2
So there’s Steve, mentally and creatively fatigued, doing his best to chip in with little fragments that the band might be able to make something out of. Or really anything that might come to mind at all. Perhaps drawing on this kind of lethargy, he conjures up an acoustic bit in F# minor. It’s just a riff, played at an very languid speed. I doubt he was sitting there with a metronome, but if he were he’d find that his riff clocked in at about 75 beats per minute, or BPM. This happens to fall right in the normal range for resting - or even sleeping - heartrates for human adults. Breathe in, breathe out. Drift a little, riff a little. It was tranquil, it was lovely, and it caught Tony’s ears.
Tony: Steve had come in with this really nice sort of guitar bit, and it happened to be in 3/4. And I had this chorus that I had that was sort of hanging around; I hadn’t got any home for it. Which was in 3/4 as well. So we tried the two together and it worked really well. 2
See, Steve’s bit, though very pretty, didn’t really do much of anything. He’d kind of loop the riff, chime a little around the scale, and...then what? The creative juices were spent. But that’s the beauty of a band setting with multiple writers; others can pick up the slack.
Tony: What Steve had written didn’t really have a chorus. It needed something to kind of lead you to it. So this sort of “If we can help you we will,” that bit, I had this sort of bit I had originally written on the piano in fact, and then transferred it to guitar. And with the voice then singing what the piano used to play, which was kind of like where the chords change. It produced quite a nice little harmony piece I think. 2
“Yeah Steve, let’s mash this thing up against my bit like the good ol’ Trespass days...well, trust me, they were the good ol’ days. Oh, and, pick it up a little will you? You sound half asleep over there.”
Steve: Sped up guitar on the introduction; I was playing at half speed. And then it gets joined by Mike and Tony. Very sort of typical Genesis feel on this one. Guitars chiming away. 3
Now running a much brisker 150 BPM after doubling the tempo, the song maintains its sleepy feel but gains an all-important lilt that will allow its melodies to really come alive. It’s Steve and Tony, just duct taping their ideas together. Hey, it worked for “Hairless Heart”, right? Let’s give it the ol’ fusion dance one more time. But wait a minute, this one has voice in the arrangement. That means lyrics, right? Who’s going to take those? Steve, got any ideas? Steve? Steve, wake up. I need to know if you STEVE, wake up please. Do you have any ideas for the lyrics?
Steve: “Freudian slumber”...I was thinking about a psychiatrist at the time hypnotizing a patient and taking him back into a world of troubling dreams. Phil Collins at the time, I think with the “over the rooftops and houses” thing, he said he thought it had a Mary Poppins feel, maybe a sort of chim-chimney-cheroo thing. But I think it was dealing with sort of deeper issues than that. The lyrics [are] basically mine. What sounds like the chorus is really Tony Banks’ [music], but nonetheless it’s my lyric that wraps the whole thing together. 3
Hypnotic music this is, so why not try to actually hypnotize someone in the words? Calm, soothing descriptions of dreamy visions, all unclear but not unpleasant. Images to replace the unwanted subconscious intrusions that plague him when his eyes are closed. Fading awareness melting into the light “ahs” of multi-tracked Phil, sending you off to rest your weary bones. Then a turn in the chorus from minor to major; a conversation with the professionals who will solve all your sleep problems. Don’t worry, we do this all the time. Just try to sleep in this quiet room; we’ll play some light music to help you. Let yourself drift away.
Steve: Tony and I enjoyed writing "Entangled", exploring the other-worldly atmosphere of the mind floating free beyond the world of harsh reality. 4
Tony: I think “Entangled” is one of my favorite songs on the album. It makes for a very strong combination with the lyric written by Steve, which I think works really well as well. 2
If “Entangled” stopped there, after two verses and two choruses, it would be a great song. It’s a song about sleep and dreams - moreso even than the later effort literally called “Dreaming While You Sleep” - and it sounds sleepy and dreamy through and through. But it doesn’t stop there. Not at all.
Steve: And then, you know, it floats off into something much bigger toward the end. 3
Tony: “Entangled” was more just a chord sequence that I was playing and that end bit was Mike’s actually, and we just used it. We were blues-ing on it and playing chords against the chords and seeing what I could get away with, which was something I have always liked to do. 5
This is an interesting admission here, since Mike doesn’t have a writing credit on the song. I can only guess that Tony was improvising with Mike, heard him play something, then said “Yeah, do that, in this way,” so that Mike was more the inspiration rather than a full writer. But it is curious. Regardless, after this serene song about trying to get rid of troubling dreams, the song ends with a pair of jokes. The first, of course, is the line about being presented the bill. Just a playful little wide-eyed moment before the end. That’s the obvious one. But the bigger joke is the precursor to that, “You’ll have no trouble…” This guy goes into a clinic to get hypnotized so his troubling dreams can be dismissed away, then goes to sleep in the end and we get this swirling, churning combination of keyboard, guitar, bass pedals, and Mellotron choir. In other words, troubling dreams. It didn’t work! The doctor was a quack all along!
A sterile sleep clinic is basically the worst place on earth to sleep, and planting images into the head of a patient struggling to expel images is basically the worst way to treat insomnia. I’d say these are things “Entangled” taught me, but I know these truths viscerally through my own life experience. It seems that perhaps Steve Hackett knew them too.
“Entangled” is the perfect song to get lost in. It’s the blissful union of two tremendous progressive songwriters, of words to music, and of conveyed mood to receptive listener. Have you ever just closed your eyes, laid down, and listened to this track? Whenever I do, I inevitably feel myself beginning to float away. Without fail the song ends before I fully fall asleep, being only six and a half minutes long, but the effect remains profound. It’s a soporific of synths, a sedative of strings, an anesthetic of auditory pleasure. Genesis may have other songs that are more complex and involved compositionally, but for my money they don’t have any that are more atmospheric.
Now if you’ll excuse me, I need to get to bed.
Let’s hear it from the band!
Tony: Probably my favorite track on that album, ending with a great cathedral-type feeling. The ARP Pro Solo[ist] synthesizer I was using had a touch sensitive keyboard and if you pressed a key hard you got this vibrato, and could produce this marvelous high note that sounded like some wild cartoon soprano female. 6
Mike: I think compared to some albums A Trick of the Tail is very consistent. And because of its very high standard it’s difficult picking out any one track [as a favorite]. 7
Steve: Psychiatrists and couches and a guy being hypnotized. Many years later, after I’d been playing thousands of shows, I hit a reef and I started to get stage fright after I’d played with an orchestra live. And I saw a psychiatrist myself, who gave me some hypnotherapy. And I didn’t realize that I was actually very successfully hypnotized, and the more this guy talked about positives, and about how good I was at what I was doing, I started weeping openly in front of [him]. And I said, “Well that must be very unusual.” And he said, “Actually, it’s very common. It’s because when you’re hypnotized, you don’t have the usual emotional blocks.” Because I don’t normally burst into tears in front of complete strangers. But I remember Terry Jones of Monty Python doing exactly the same when he was hypnotized on TV. Anyway, I hope you still love the song; I do. 3
1. The Waiting Room, 1997
2. 2007 Box Set
3. Steve Hackett, 2020
4. HackettSongs, 2018
5. The Waiting Room, 2015
6. Genesis: Chapter & Verse
7. NME, 1977
submitted by LordChozo to Genesis [link] [comments]


2020.09.25 07:59 SomeGuy0793 27 [M4F] New York

Hi there!
I’m a professional musician who has spent most of the past seven years on the road, both domestically and internationally. The pandemic has completely changed things, so I’ve been home for the past 6 ½ months.
I love comedy - standup, sitcoms, movies. I’m a huge Mel Brooks and Monty Python fan.
I am a massive Disney fan, particularly of the parks. I am an Annual Passholder at Walt Disney World and also try to go to Disneyland at least once a year. I visited Disneyland Paris several years ago, and I’d love to take a trip to all of the parks in Asia at some point in the near future as well.
I’m also very into roller coasters.
I’m a very big baseball fan, particularly of the Mets. I watch every game I can, and in more normal times, I try to go to 6-10 games a season.
I’m a staunch Democrat.
I rarely drink; I do not smoke or use drugs.
I am not a gamer.
As far as physical appearance, I’m 5’ 11 ½”, brown hair, brown eyes, and I wear glasses. I frequently grow my beard out, though it’s a bit short right now. I’ve gained a bunch of weight since I’ve been off the road; I’m trying very hard to lose it.
I would be more than happy to send a picture or two in exchange for one of you.
I’m looking for a woman who is as passionate about her career as I am mine, enjoys traveling, is extremely kind, understanding, and caring, and has a great sense of humor. It’d be great to have a lot of similar interests, of course. Someone within a few hours' drive would be ideal.
Hope to hear from you soon!
submitted by SomeGuy0793 to ForeverAloneDating [link] [comments]


2020.09.24 18:11 Boop108 György Pálfi’s Taxadermia

This article is illustrated with numerous film stills. If you would like to see the illustrated version click here.
https://medium.com/@36toesproductions/gy%C3%B6rgy-p%C3%A1lfis-taxadermia-181a1f574dc8?sk=6104aa1afa93f3e7ac4c6c0c5ac22fb1
After you recover from the shock of the opening scene you realize you will need to recalibrate your surrealism scale if you are going to get through György Pálfi’s Taxadermia. This isn’t going to just be weird or dreamlike, watching this film is going to take some fortitude, otherwise, how would you account for an opening scene where a man in a grimy, little shack, masturbates until, with a triumphant yell, he shoots a plume of fire out his penis.
Taxidermia is both beautiful and nauseating. It's a film of extremes that swings wildly in many directions. The camera reflects this in its movements. Suddenly the camera will start traveling in the most improbable, or even impossible directions. It passes through walls or under people, spinning in an impossible space. Its as though the screen we are watching is falling victim to the surrealism it is depicting.
There is a mind-bending scene where the floor of a room becomes something like a panel in a revolving door. It spins, and each time it flips over there is something new on the other side. We watch the changing sets and lose our orientation which turns the movie itself into a surreal object.
Pálfi made Taxidermia in 2006 in Hungary. I am sure that there is an entire layer of this film that I do not fully understand due to my limited knowledge of Hungarian history and politics. However, the film reaches much further than just a political allegory or parody. The primary engine of the film is the human body. Not just the shape of our physique but the blood, shit, vomit, semen, sweat, guts, and viscera of our existence. There’s sex and death and competitive eating.
The film centers around three men, each the son of the former. The first is Morosgovanyi, a libidinal, Caliban-like, perpetual masturbator. He’s the one whose penis shoots fire. He will hump anything, a hole in the wall, a pile of butchered pig parts, anywhere his member will fit. There are no cutaways or carefully cropped frames we see his penis plunge in and out of a hole in a shed until a rooster comes along and pecks it. A cock attacked by a cock.
When he is frantically humping the pig parts he fantasizes that it is an enormous corpulent woman screaming obscene instructions and encouragement. The editing flashes between the pig flesh, human flesh, butchery, fornication, masturbation, and close-ups of things that might be any of the above until you’re nauseous, confused, and ready to pass out.
Psychologist Harry Stack Sullivan once wrote about the boundaries we erect to differentiate between what he termed “the me” and the “not me.” Sullivan posed a simple experiment. Spit into a glass. Pause a moment, and then drink it back down. Many would recoil at the idea but Sullivan asks us to consider how arbitrary our reaction is. When the saliva is in your mouth it doesn’t bother you, but just a second later it is repulsive.
In Taxidermia, we are faced with all of our mortal productions. It's up to us to gauge our reactions. I giant mass of innards is both a repulsive horror, but as it steams in the cold it is also fascinating and even beautiful.
The U.S. Military has a division that weaponizes horrible smells. In their research, they found that the key to a truly intolerable stink is that it must have pleasant and attractive elements. It’s as if it has to be a bait and switch. You need to be intrigued or aroused before the hammer comes down.
Surrealist Merit Oppenhiem’s Fur-lined Teacup from 1936 plays with this dynamic as well. It is discordant and uncomfortable but it is also sexy and evocative. Similarly, in Taxedermia, there is a scene where two people are huddled outside in the snow. We watch their interaction, but it isn’t until halfway through the scene that we notice that the snowflakes falling around them are little white feathers. The accumulation on the ground, on their coats, and in their hair isn’t the pure white crystals we thought they were, they are something corporal and dirty.
Morosgovanyi’s son is Kalman an enormous hulk of a man born with a pigtail that we watch Morosgovanyi cut off in close-up while the baby Kalman wails. Morosgovanyi’s world was that of the peasants. A farm filled with mud and shit. Morosgovanyi’s son inhabits a bourgeois world of Soviet-style progress. To emphasize the irony of Soviet culture Kalman is a competitive eater. A communist country obsessed with production and efficiency stages a grotesque display of conspicuous consumption. We are treated to several scenes of Kalman methodically gorging himself as well as expelling such copious amounts of vomit that even Monty Pythons Mr. Creosote would cringe. The competitions are conducted with Soviet Flags and dancing girls. It's like some psychotic pageant. They eat giant gelatinous blocks of horse sausage or gallons of caviar out of a red trough-shaped like a Soviet star.
Kalman gets married and has a son, Balatony. When Balatony grows up he becomes a taxidermist. Just in case there is some bit of bloody, fatty, goo that Pálfi missed in the first two-thirds of the film, he manages to cover all his morbid bases in this last third. Even so, there is still a kind of poetic beauty in the madness. We watch Balatony prepare an orangutan for stuffing. It's disgusting and brutal but also compelling. Instead of flashing us a shockingly gory moment and leaving us to imagine the rest, the camera watches intently as Balatony separates the skin from the fat and facia. It gives us time to get used to what we are seeing and examine it.
Balatony is a very creepy and completely miserable man. When he is not stuffing animal carcasses he must administer to his aging father’s needs. Kalman has grown so fat he can no longer move. The relationship between the two men and what transpires in the last third of the film is truly jarring and bizarre. Some things are better off left to the viewer to discover on their own, but the father being immobilized by excessive consumption, and the son being enslaved to an ungrateful beast who longs only for its past glory sets up abundant metaphors about capitalism, communism, and the masses of people caught in-between.
Taxidermia uses the human body as its arena. It is the vehicle for discussing our motivations, our excesses, our attempts at control, our relationship to society, and the state. In his book Discipline and Punish, Foucault tracks the changing relationship between the body and the state. A relationship that begins as corporal, where punishment is meted out physically on the body, but changes to something more insidious where the state targets our minds instead of our bodies.
Public hangings and floggings made obvious the power dynamic of the state and its ability to control behavior through force. Foucault compares this to the modern age and the rise of the surveillance state where the power dynamic between the individual and the state is hidden by an internalized coercion. By imagining the eyes of our neighbors and coworkers upon us, by raising the specter of Big Brother the blunt violence of the past is replaced with the more insidious hegemony of a state-sponsored super-ego that sounds like our own voice.
Taxidermia depicts this dynamic but reminds us that the mind can not be separated from the body. The brain is an organ like any other. No matter how abstract our thoughts may be we are still bound by our material existence. Our body is what anchors us to reality like a boat with its anchor down and its engines spinning. We aspire to become many things but we are always still flesh and blood and vomit, and semen, and sweat, and urine, and tears, and all the other things we produce and either accept or reject.
Marx focused on humans as producers of objects. He wrote about factories and the means of production but our bodies are already in a constant state of production and consumption. All life must destroy life in order to maintain itself and through that destruction turn the life consumed into waste. Life eats life and shits out waste which is then eaten by other life.
To make life more palatable we try not to think in these terms. We essentially hide the truth away and sniff fine wine seeking out the notes of oak or pear instead of slurping down the rotten juice of dead grapes in order to feel the queasy joy brought on by having ingested poison. So too the state prefers its own illusions of humanity and egalitarian justice and masks its poison in rarefied ideals.
submitted by Boop108 to flicks [link] [comments]


2020.09.24 18:10 Boop108 György Pálfi’s Taxadermia

This article is illustrated with numerous film stills. If you would like to see the illustrated version click here.
https://medium.com/@36toesproductions/gy%C3%B6rgy-p%C3%A1lfis-taxadermia-181a1f574dc8?sk=6104aa1afa93f3e7ac4c6c0c5ac22fb1
After you recover from the shock of the opening scene you realize you will need to recalibrate your surrealism scale if you are going to get through György Pálfi’s Taxadermia. This isn’t going to just be weird or dreamlike, watching this film is going to take some fortitude, otherwise, how would you account for an opening scene where a man in a grimy, little shack, masturbates until, with a triumphant yell, he shoots a plume of fire out his penis.
Taxidermia is both beautiful and nauseating. It's a film of extremes that swings wildly in many directions. The camera reflects this in its movements. Suddenly the camera will start traveling in the most improbable, or even impossible directions. It passes through walls or under people, spinning in an impossible space. Its as though the screen we are watching is falling victim to the surrealism it is depicting.
There is a mind-bending scene where the floor of a room becomes something like a panel in a revolving door. It spins, and each time it flips over there is something new on the other side. We watch the changing sets and lose our orientation which turns the movie itself into a surreal object.
Pálfi made Taxidermia in 2006 in Hungary. I am sure that there is an entire layer of this film that I do not fully understand due to my limited knowledge of Hungarian history and politics. However, the film reaches much further than just a political allegory or parody. The primary engine of the film is the human body. Not just the shape of our physique but the blood, shit, vomit, semen, sweat, guts, and viscera of our existence. There’s sex and death and competitive eating.
The film centers around three men, each the son of the former. The first is Morosgovanyi, a libidinal, Caliban-like, perpetual masturbator. He’s the one whose penis shoots fire. He will hump anything, a hole in the wall, a pile of butchered pig parts, anywhere his member will fit. There are no cutaways or carefully cropped frames we see his penis plunge in and out of a hole in a shed until a rooster comes along and pecks it. A cock attacked by a cock.
When he is frantically humping the pig parts he fantasizes that it is an enormous corpulent woman screaming obscene instructions and encouragement. The editing flashes between the pig flesh, human flesh, butchery, fornication, masturbation, and close-ups of things that might be any of the above until you’re nauseous, confused, and ready to pass out.
Psychologist Harry Stack Sullivan once wrote about the boundaries we erect to differentiate between what he termed “the me” and the “not me.” Sullivan posed a simple experiment. Spit into a glass. Pause a moment, and then drink it back down. Many would recoil at the idea but Sullivan asks us to consider how arbitrary our reaction is. When the saliva is in your mouth it doesn’t bother you, but just a second later it is repulsive.
In Taxidermia, we are faced with all of our mortal productions. It's up to us to gauge our reactions. I giant mass of innards is both a repulsive horror, but as it steams in the cold it is also fascinating and even beautiful.
The U.S. Military has a division that weaponizes horrible smells. In their research, they found that the key to a truly intolerable stink is that it must have pleasant and attractive elements. It’s as if it has to be a bait and switch. You need to be intrigued or aroused before the hammer comes down.
Surrealist Merit Oppenhiem’s Fur-lined Teacup from 1936 plays with this dynamic as well. It is discordant and uncomfortable but it is also sexy and evocative. Similarly, in Taxedermia, there is a scene where two people are huddled outside in the snow. We watch their interaction, but it isn’t until halfway through the scene that we notice that the snowflakes falling around them are little white feathers. The accumulation on the ground, on their coats, and in their hair isn’t the pure white crystals we thought they were, they are something corporal and dirty.
Morosgovanyi’s son is Kalman an enormous hulk of a man born with a pigtail that we watch Morosgovanyi cut off in close-up while the baby Kalman wails. Morosgovanyi’s world was that of the peasants. A farm filled with mud and shit. Morosgovanyi’s son inhabits a bourgeois world of Soviet-style progress. To emphasize the irony of Soviet culture Kalman is a competitive eater. A communist country obsessed with production and efficiency stages a grotesque display of conspicuous consumption. We are treated to several scenes of Kalman methodically gorging himself as well as expelling such copious amounts of vomit that even Monty Pythons Mr. Creosote would cringe. The competitions are conducted with Soviet Flags and dancing girls. It's like some psychotic pageant. They eat giant gelatinous blocks of horse sausage or gallons of caviar out of a red trough-shaped like a Soviet star.
Kalman gets married and has a son, Balatony. When Balatony grows up he becomes a taxidermist. Just in case there is some bit of bloody, fatty, goo that Pálfi missed in the first two-thirds of the film, he manages to cover all his morbid bases in this last third. Even so, there is still a kind of poetic beauty in the madness. We watch Balatony prepare an orangutan for stuffing. It's disgusting and brutal but also compelling. Instead of flashing us a shockingly gory moment and leaving us to imagine the rest, the camera watches intently as Balatony separates the skin from the fat and facia. It gives us time to get used to what we are seeing and examine it.
Balatony is a very creepy and completely miserable man. When he is not stuffing animal carcasses he must administer to his aging father’s needs. Kalman has grown so fat he can no longer move. The relationship between the two men and what transpires in the last third of the film is truly jarring and bizarre. Some things are better off left to the viewer to discover on their own, but the father being immobilized by excessive consumption, and the son being enslaved to an ungrateful beast who longs only for its past glory sets up abundant metaphors about capitalism, communism, and the masses of people caught in-between.
Taxidermia uses the human body as its arena. It is the vehicle for discussing our motivations, our excesses, our attempts at control, our relationship to society, and the state. In his book Discipline and Punish, Foucault tracks the changing relationship between the body and the state. A relationship that begins as corporal, where punishment is meted out physically on the body, but changes to something more insidious where the state targets our minds instead of our bodies.
Public hangings and floggings made obvious the power dynamic of the state and its ability to control behavior through force. Foucault compares this to the modern age and the rise of the surveillance state where the power dynamic between the individual and the state is hidden by an internalized coercion. By imagining the eyes of our neighbors and coworkers upon us, by raising the specter of Big Brother the blunt violence of the past is replaced with the more insidious hegemony of a state-sponsored super-ego that sounds like our own voice.
Taxidermia depicts this dynamic but reminds us that the mind can not be separated from the body. The brain is an organ like any other. No matter how abstract our thoughts may be we are still bound by our material existence. Our body is what anchors us to reality like a boat with its anchor down and its engines spinning. We aspire to become many things but we are always still flesh and blood and vomit, and semen, and sweat, and urine, and tears, and all the other things we produce and either accept or reject.
Marx focused on humans as producers of objects. He wrote about factories and the means of production but our bodies are already in a constant state of production and consumption. All life must destroy life in order to maintain itself and through that destruction turn the life consumed into waste. Life eats life and shits out waste which is then eaten by other life.
To make life more palatable we try not to think in these terms. We essentially hide the truth away and sniff fine wine seeking out the notes of oak or pear instead of slurping down the rotten juice of dead grapes in order to feel the queasy joy brought on by having ingested poison. So too the state prefers its own illusions of humanity and egalitarian justice and masks its poison in rarefied ideals.
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2020.09.23 19:21 HenriDucard95 my files

GamePhysics geek geekswhodrink generalAI gentlemanbonersgifs geography getdisciplined GetMotivated GifRecipes gifs gifsthatkeepongiving GiftIdeas Gifts GirlsMirin godtiersuperpowers google greentext headphones HelloInternet HindiLanguage history HistoryMemes HolUp homelab HowToHack hyderabad IAmA iamverysmart IASIP IdiotsFightingThings ihavesex iiiiiiitttttttttttt IllegallySmolCats india IndiaInvestments indiameme IndianFootball IndianGaming indianpeoplefacebook Instagramreality Intelligence interestingasfuck InternetIsBeautiful investing iphone itsaunixsystem IWantToLearn jailbreak jesuschristreddit Jokes justforsocialmedia KatDennings keto kittengifs KneadyCats learnprogramming LearnUselessTalents LeopardsAteMyFace LifeProTips Liftingmusic likeus linux linux4noobs linux_gaming linuxmasterrace linuxquestions listentothis loseit mac macbook macbookair macbookpro MachineLearning macsetups madlads malefashionadvice malelifestyle malelivingspace MapPorn Marvel marvelstudios math mathriddles mealtimevideos mechanical_gifs medicalschool medizzy MegaMusic mildlyinteresting MildlyVandalised mkbhd modelmakers Monero montypython MontyPythonMemes motogp motorcycles movies moviescirclejerk Moviesinthemaking MurderedByWords Music NatureIsFuckingLit natureismetal netflix networking nevertellmetheodds news nextfuckinglevel NFC Ni_Bondha NoahGetTheBoat NolanBatmanMemes nostalgia NoStupidQuestions NotintheMovie nottheonion okbuddyretard oldfreefolk oldpeoplefacebook OldSchoolCool OopsDidntMeanTo opensource osdev osx osxterminal PartyParrot personalfinance PetsareAmazing photography photoshopbattles pics pokemon PostureTipsGuide povertyfinance PowerShell PraiseTheCameraMan PremierLeague PrettyGirls ProgrammerHumor programming psychology PUBATTLEGROUNDS PunPatrol pureasoiaf quant quantfinance quityourbullshit rally rareinsults raspberry_pi RBI reactiongifs RedLetterMedia relationships RestaurantsThatMeme RoomPorn running SacredGeometry SaddestBackflip SaimanSays science SF_Book_Club ShitPostCrusaders shittymoviedetails Showerthoughts SixtySecondsInAfrica skyrim soccer soccercirclejerk socialskills space spacex sports spotify starterpacks startpages Stock_Picks stocks SuggestALaptop suggestmeabook suspiciouslyspecific sysadmin tattoo tattoos Tay_Tweets television telnet terriblefacebookmemes thanosdidnothingwrong TheBoys thelastofus TheRedPill ThriftStoreHauls tifu TikTokCringe TIL_Uncensored todayilearned ToiletPaperUSA tombstoning TopMindsOfReddit toptalent trivia TuckedInPuppies TVDetails TwoXChromosomes UFOs ukulele UnethicalLifeProTips Unexpected unexpectedoffice UniversityofReddit unixporn UnixProTips UnresolvedMysteries UpliftingNews UPSC vertcoin videos vinyl Visiblemending vmware WarplanePorn Warthunder Watches Watchmen webcomics whatisthisthing wheredidthesodago whiteknighting WhitePeopleTwitter WikiLeaks wimmelbilder WolvesWithWatermelons woodworking woof_irl worldnews wowthissubexists youngpeopleyoutube YoutubeCompendium
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2020.09.23 18:06 Red-HandedBandit 6 months of lockdown

How has the lockdown affected your enjoyment of British Humour? Have you actually been locked down? How many times have you found yourself off your tits pissed watching reruns of shameless or Monty Python? What have you done to keep your sanity?
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2020.09.22 10:58 travel_ali 10 days around Scotland by rental car in August/September 2019.

I have collected the Scotland related resources that I used for this trip and others here
Day Start End Highlights
1 Fri Switzerland Stirling Stirling castle and old town
2 Sat Stirling Arrochar Loch Lomond region
3 Sun Arrochar Dunvegan (Skye) Scenic drive
4 Mon Dunvegan (Skye) Dunvegan (Skye) Rain, Coral beach.
5 Tues Dunvegan (Skye) Dunvegan (Skye) Neist point, Trotternish peninsula loop.
6 Wed Dunvegan (Skye) Fort Augustus Scenic drive.
7 Thurs Fort Augustus Ballater Scenic drive. Reindeer centre.
8 Fri Ballater Edinburgh Scenic drive
9 Sat Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh sights. Arthurs seat.
10 Sun Edinburgh Switzerland Flight home
This was a rather fast tour for the most part over 10 days at the end of August and start of September (not even 10 days really, more like 8.5). It was intended as exploration to get a feel for the land, and to then come back to the areas later.
The idea was 2 hour hops with time for hiking and exploring each day. In the end it worked out as way too much driving, clocking in 800 miles (1287km) in 7 days (not helped by the weather which just encouraged more driving). The main lesson I learned from this is that I would book earlier to find nice B&Bs to use as a base for longer stays in a smaller number of areas.
Timing - Last few days of August to early September.
What we did - Explored really. Had hoped to hike more but the weather didn’t play along.
Language – Easy being a native speaker. Never any problem with an overly thick accent. More problems trying to pronounce place names.
Budget – I kept this open but without doing anything excessive in price. Accommodation and eating out were the main costs. Skye and Edinburgh had especially high accommodation prices.
Accomodation - From faded glory hotels to wooden sheds. Mostly chosen by reasonable price and being in the right area. We only really booked most of the stuff a month or less in advance which limited the choices of where to stay somewhat.
Weather – Cool and wet. We had on/off drizzle most of the time. What the BBC called heavy rain was mostly never too bad. It seemed to be unlucky with a week of bad weather after a period of good weather. It got to be a bit frustrating when everyday just seemed to be this way, but cleared up towards the end.
There was no midge problems at least. We got about 3 very minor bites during the whole trip.
Touristyness – Edinburgh and Skye were very touristy. Otherwise most areas were not bad or going through the backroads almost empty.
Transport – Rental car from/to Stirling. Train from Edinburgh to Stirling and vv.
Regrets – Too high a pace.
Just for some more listicle….
  • Best surprise: Driving on the scenic roads through the Cairngorms.
  • Most expensive: Skye and Edinburgh.
  • Most touristy: Skye and Edinburgh.
  • Worst tourist tack: Princess Diana memorial tartan.
--- General lessons learned ---
  • Wind and rain was likely at any time. We came prepared and were very glad. Waterproof trousers, jacket, and mud suitable shoes were on hand at all times.
  • Cafes often open at 9am or later. Getting an early start if you want to have a coffee first can be a little hard
  • Free parking was much more common than I expected. Even spots like Eilean Donan castle (where I am sure England would charge you £8 or more). Though finding a road-side parking spot with a good views or access to hiking routes was often not an easy feat. Likewise car parks in more popular areas were often very busy/full.
  • If you are driving on the more rural roads then add up to 50% to the journey time for slower traffic, single lane passing, stopping for the views, and not being able to drive at the limit anyway without killing yourself on the unknown windy roads.
  • Maps.me not as detailed here as in other places. It also massively underestimated the driving time in rural areas due to the above point. Google maps was more accurate, but also gave optimistic driving times.
  • Driving on the single lane roads was mostly fine. There are lots of passing points and considerate drivers. Mostly it was only cars with non-UK plates that caused problems.
  • Potholes in the road, and sheep on the road, were the two main driving hazards. The potholes were especially nasty in the rain when it was impossible to tell if something was a 5mm deep puddle, or a 10cm deep destroyer of wheels. The sheep mostly stayed out of the road, but did tend to sit right on the verge and stare as you drove past inches from their faces.
Skye in particular.
  • Skye is very popular. Book accommodation early, and reserve restaurants rather than just turning up.
  • The services and access on the island are being expanded, but it was also clearly at a limit. Outside of the roads between the main villages, it is all single lane with passing points. Parking was limited and often full, near full or even overflowing (and this was even in bad weather). I would not want to be trying to get around the popular spots in Skye in high summer.
  • It is big and the roads are small and windy. Don't expect to quickly see it all in a day.
  • Research places beyond the popular spots to avoid a crowded entry road (or turn up early and hope someone doesn’t block you in).
  • Finding dinner at short notice can also be a bit of a problem, the hours are short in many places and large chunks of the island (the north east especially) seem to only have a few high-end gourmet restaurants rather than just relaxed pubs.
--- Detailed Run-Down ---
Day 1 - Switzerland to Stirling
Landing in Edinburgh we took the long way in via Edinburgh Waverley, rather than going to an outer station. It was good to get another look at the city centre at least. Getting off to a British start with a tea and a sausage roll for a sack.
The Edinburgh-Stirling line is nice but not stunning. You get a fairly good view of the Kelpies (horse heads statue) from the train, and a taste of the country to come from the hills in the distance.
Stirling old-town is small but pretty. Almost more like a village at times. It was much quieter than Edinburgh tourist wise. We arrived at 1pm and were welcomed by drizzle (not heavy or cold at least). Lunch at the Blue lagoon chippy, very friendly, cheap and good too.
Spent the afternoon at the castle which is an interesting mix of styles (various events have led the oldest parts from the more dramatic part of history to be replaced by more “modern” buildings). There are tours included in the price and bits of info, but knowing the basics of the history beforehand helps. We joined a tour which was celebrating a specific event and had a private tour as nobody else chose to join it. A highlight was the optimistic ice-cream man trying to sell luxury Scottish ice-cream in the .
Only really had an afternoon in Stirling. So no time for Wallace Memorial or the Back Walk around the castle. Though a full day would have been enough to fit it all in.
We stayed at the YHA in the old town (right up the hill). Very grand building from the outside, but it was much less fancy inside. Nice spot for a night.
Dinner at the Spice lounge. Really good curry with giant naans.
Day 2 - Stirling to Arrochar via loch Lomond
We took a taxi out to collect a rental car. A big part of coming to Stirling was to pick-up the car in a quiet region. The Glasgow road site allowed us to get out into the small country roads with just a few simple roundabouts and after rush hour. Very nice taxi driver and staff.
The expected weather had gone back and forth quite a bit, and so we had generated a fair few Ideas:
  • The Battle of Bannockburn Visitor Centre (directly by the car rental).
  • Dunblane Cathedral.
  • Glengoyne distillery.
  • Doune distillery and Doune “Monty Python” castle.
  • Luss
In the end we drove to Doune, admired the village (beautiful but tiny), and took breakfast at the very good Buttercup cafe which had a Saturday market. It was only a short walk to the castle (though having seen enough before we didn’t bother going in).
We got talking to a local(ish) couple over breakfast who gave us the idea to head to Loch Lommand at Balmaha and take the boat over to the island of Inchcailloch. In the end the boat was not running due to high winds. A chat with the info centre brought up a few ideas. Including a 10km +/-300m hike up conic hill. Great views. Windy on/off rain. West highland mix of serious and stop off.
I had Arrochar listed as a point of interest, though whether that was for scenic or historical reasons I am not sure. There are certainly very nice views along the loch and over to the Cobbler mountain formation. Arrochar on the other hand is not of interest in itself, a few cafes but otherwise just some houses strewn along the loch.
We stayed at the Bespoke hotel. Kind of posh, but at the same time feeling a little worn and past its best without much character. It had worse WiFi than YHA or anywhere else that we visited in Scotland.
There were not tempting options in Arrochar so we drove to the nearby Loch Lanj restaurant for dinner. The place itself was interesting being in an old church and was mostly a good choice. It was slightly ruined by the Saturday night entertainment who did a seemingly endless 1.5+hrs without a break.
Day 3 - Arrochar to Skye
This was the longest driving day. Which turned out to be much longer than expected. In retrospect this should have been 2 days with a night somewhere in the Fort William region. The scenery was stunning, but started to wear a bit and become less special by the time we reached Syke which was a shame.
We had expected just under 4 hours of driving. But in the end it was more like 6 hours.
  • Stopped along Loch Lommand. Not many scenic lookout points. Most parking options are blocked in by trees from a view.
  • Stopped for tea at The Drovers Inn. An old and rather whimsical pub.
  • Stopped for coffee and scones at the Bridge of Orchy Hotel. In contrast to the Drovers this was very modern in style (still good).
  • The road was very impressive afterwards on the pass to Glencoe. The section around Altnafeadh was possibly the best part of the day. It felt a shame to only be able to see it in passing. It all felt so wild and empty. Especially compared to the endless farms and villages in Switzerland.
  • Fort William has nothing of interest beyond a few supermarkets.
  • We had thought to divert off to the Glenfinnan Viaduct (The Harry Potter train bridge) after Fort William, but dropped it as time was already pressing.
  • Lunch in the car park mid way along Loch Lochy.
  • Viewpoint at Loch Garry. The view to the west is noted for looking like the map of Scotland.
  • Eilean Donan Castle. We just arrived as heavy rain turned to sunshine which was rather nice. It was a good 5 minute stop to admire the building, but I wasn’t fussed to go in.
  • Driving over the bridge to Skye and onwards was pretty. But by this point it was all blending together after driving for too long.
We stayed the Spinning Wheel Pod in Dunvegan. A pod (basically a fancy shed) in the garden of the hosts, about 10 minutes walk out of the village centre. It was cosy but nice. The hosts were very friendly. The price was rather high all things considered (but we didn’t have many other options in the area as we booked late). The hosts were very friendly and helpful. The booking came with breakfast at the bakery in the village, but that only started when the bakery opened at the surprising hour of 10am.
Dunvegan village itself is rather basic. It was not a bad base, but not somewhere to visit in itself. There are a few basic shops and cafes, but these are mostly closed after 3pm. There are not many options for food in the evening: almost anywhere closer than portree is expensive gourmet dinning.
As the sun was setting we walked up to the standing stone which dominates the village (and turns out it was put there in 2000).
Day 4 - Skye
We had various ideas lined up of what to do on the island:
  • Whale / Dolphin watching.
  • Neist Point lighthouse (close to Dunvegan).
  • Coral Beach (close to Dunvegan).
  • Drive around the Trotternish peninsula (sticky out bit in the north east) with stops for the Quiraing, Old Man of Storr, and various smaller spots (eg: Mealtfalls, Brothers Point, Lealt Falls).
  • Something in the Cuillin, like the Fairy Pools.
However a forecast of heavy rain rather screwed much of that up. We took a late breakfast whilst considering the options in the rain.
The first idea was a 30 minute drive to the Talisker Distillery in Carbost. Leaving the main road we met our first bit of single lane but plenty of passing spaces. There was however no chance of finding parking in the village. Locals were clearly annoyed at tourists, with endless signs informing you that the spots were for residents rather than visitors. As this was one of the few indoor sites on the island it was not a surprise (and I imagine it was probably rammed inside, so probably for the best that we didn’t get in).
We headed on to Portree in the pouring rain, just getting the last parking spot in the large free section. Portree is useful as a base and source of shops, but isn’t that interesting in itself. The harbour side is nice enough but small and not that pretty as far as UK harbour villages go. It also felt a bit sad given how many other tourists were mouching around the gift shops hoping the rain would stop. Cullen Skink soup at the Lower Deck for lunch - very good and very suitable food for the day.
Heading back to our lodgings to just relax and read we were surprised to see the weather start to pick up. We intended to drive a few minutes further to see Dunvegan Castle. But it was not in sight from the road, and the £14 entry was far too much to see a not overly special stately home (you get a decent enough view 3 minutes further down the road).
We pressed on down the single-lane road to the Coral Beach as the weather seemed to be improving still. We got a spot to park, but even on a moody day like that there were not many spots free (or that many in total really). Walking for 30 minutes or so got us to the beach, which was indeed made of corals and did have some nice views.
Dinner at the Old School House (having reserved earlier by phone). Very good and cheaper than anything else in that half of the island.
Day 5 - Skye
This day was predicted to be cloudy but with probable patches of rain. Not ideal but much better than the previous day.
We headed out to Neist point for something to do before the free breakfast at 10am. It was a beautiful 45 minute or so drive (quiet to at 8am). The weather was not perfect, but it wasn’t raining and there was some visibility at least. The site at the end was rather basic: a little cafe hut and some parking (but surprisingly no toilets, which begs questions of what it is like in the summer with lots of people….). We walked down to the lighthouse and back up again. Back for 10am breakfast at the bakery. Free rolls and scones.
The big goal for the day was the Trotternish loop (clockwise from Uig to Portree). After Uig the road turned to single lane until Stenscholl (and even after that changed to single lane a few times on the way to Portree). The traffic was never heavy and passing was always easy - though I did see some big tour buses which must have gone through at least some single lane sections which can’t be fun.
  • Skye Museum of Island Life.
  • Single Lane Coffee shop. Beautiful views, nice place, and good food/drink. But very limited parking and a tight squeeze through a narrow gate.
  • Parked at the car park by Loch Langaig and had lunch in the Quiraing (or what we could see of it anyway).
  • We didn't bother with pass road given the weather. Next time.
  • Kilt Rock and Mealt Waterfalls. Then the Lealt falls.
  • Old man of Storr. We attempted the walk, but gave up due to heavy rain. Amazing number of people totally unprepared for the weather. Some were walking down in soggy hoodys, jeans, and converse.
  • Dinner in Portree at the Isles Inn. Good but busy (like everywhere in Portree it seemed).
After a day of cloud and rain the sky of course was beautifully clear on the way back as the last bit of daylight went away.
Day 6 Skye to Fort Augustus via Glenfinnan
Our plan for the day was to drive down to the Armadale-Mallaig ferry then to Fort Augustus.
The day started with heavy rain, but cleared up so there was mostly good visibility.
  • The initial ferry time was cancelled due to the weather the previous day, but the company made it very easy to quickly change to a later time.
  • From Harrapool down to Armadale was a nice drive on a very quiet part of the island
  • The process was very easy at ferry. Next to it was a tiny cafe and a few shops for a diversion (and a big enough dry and warm waiting room). Plus nice views over the bay.
  • The ferry ride itself was slow but scenic. Much more interesting than the bridge.
  • From Mallaig we followed the Road to the isles. Lunch on beach near Morar. But sadly no time for the alternative scenic route.
  • Beautiful drive to Glenfinnan. But not many stopping points to get out and admire the views.
  • A brief stop at Glenfinnan to see the viaduct. Though parking was crazy with people hiking in from kms down the roadside (turns out we turned up just before the steam train went by). Had an interesting chat with a lady who helped run the nearby church about the insanity of people fighting to see the train. The church itself (Church St Mary & St Finnan) was worth a look, it even had a stag hanging around in the bushes outside. I found the views of the loch and mountains better than the viaduct. Saw a few parking arguments from frustrated tourists.
  • A nice drive back up via Loch Lochy (again, but this time we a rainbow).
  • A number of swing bridges allow larger boats on the canal to pass the road. We caught a few of these which slowed us down, they were scenic spots for a wait at least.
We stayed at the Old Pier House. A fantastic place with an amazing lakeside location run by a very nice guy. It was secluded but just a short walk into the village. It also had a large chunk of land with horses and highland cows. We wished we had stayed longer.
Fort Augustus itself is a nice village. Though it is a bit too twee and perfectly manicured along the central series of locks. We had good dinner at the Lock Inn and then wandered down to the far side of the Highland Club for views down the lake.
Day 7 - Fort Augustus to Cairngorms
Started the day with a walk of the grounds to find the highland cows and horses. Followed by breakfast watching the loch and horses on the lawn.
We had two options: the main road going back to the south and then east, or scenic backroads cutting across to the north east.
We went for the scenic drive along the B862 and B851, then a less scenic stretch of the A9 down to Aviemore, finally the Old Military Road.
  • Climbing up above the Loch we got to the lookout, but poor weather. Would be a good short hike to the summit otherwise.
  • Waterfalls Falls of Foyers. A short and nice walk (without any rain!).
  • Coffee at the The Camerons Tea Rooms and Farm Shop. Nice cafe. Deer outside.
  • Drive on. Nice scenic drive. Not many options for parking to start a hike though.
  • Caringorm Reindeer centre. The paddock at the visitor centre really isn't much for the asking price (a few reindeer and some information signs). But the Reindeer Walk was well worth it: nice views and experience to be among the reindeer and feed them (plus it also includes the paddock).
  • Drive on via back roads to the Old Military Road. These were mostly single lane but fun and scenic, at the Old Military Road it was 2 lanes again. Changing landscape from fertile valley to high barren mountain pass, and back again.
We stayed at the Howe of Torbeg - basically glamping sheds. The site was very nicely done, quiet, and with great views. Again we wished we had stayed here longer (and will do a tour of the east coast and area in more depth sometime).
Drove 5 mins further to Ballater for dinner. It is a very handsome village, and being the closest to Balmoral most of the shops seem to have royal appointments. Good dinner at the Lochnagar Indian Brasserie to make a change from the pub food.
Day 8 - to Edinburgh
  • Breakfast at Ballater
  • Drove past Balmoral, but were too early to visit.
  • Beautiful drive. Past ski area then down into lush valleys.
  • Joining “bigger” roads but still easy driving.
  • Returned car. Train to Edinburgh.
Stayed at Piries Hotel by Haymarket. Convenient location for access to the city and catching an early flight. Wouldn't bother again otherwise. Very creaky bed.
From the hotel it was an easy 10 minute walk down to Dean Village. Pretty but small, not much to do there other than admire the buildings for 5 minutes though. We followed the river walk along to Stockbridge, and then went up through new town, into the old town. Japanese food at Hakataya (very good but small and very popular so reserve ahead).
Walking back through the streets and squares of the new town is a very nice way to end the day.
Day 9 - Edinburgh
We spent more time here previously
Sunshine and no rain at last on the very final day (the following week was sunshine all the way, bastards).
Southern cross cafe for breakfast. Nipping into the National library to see what books they had in the shop. Coffee at the Maison de Moggy cat cafe (an amusing novelty but not something I would bother with again).
Bus 42 to Duddingston (very slow, not helped by traffic due to road works). I had hoped from the map that this would be a little rustic village (as much as one can be this close to central Edinburgh), this was the case to an extent but I wouldn’t go back just for the village itself. Very good pub lunch at the Sheep Heid Inn.
From Duddingston we headed directly into Holyrood Park and up to Arthurs Seat. From this side it was a steep but quiet climb. The peak itself was very busy, almost comically rammed with people really. We chose to spend most of the time on the neighbouring peak of Nether Hill, sacrificing a bit of the view for more space and peace.
From either peak you get a nice view for a city and surrounding area. Though mostly the view is of the suburbs rather than old town (Calton hill is better for the old town). It is nice that it is there but I wouldn’t call the view from the top a must-see. We took the stairs down and then the Volunteers Walk across to Holyrood palace for a quick look at the palace and parliament before catching a bus back up into the old town.
There are a few spots I missed out on in Edinburgh:
  • The Tiles pub
  • Surgeon museum
  • Curry house - Omar Khayyam
Day 10 Edinburgh to Switzerland
Early flight. First tram at 5:30am to the airport.
Security line was the worst I have seen in years. Apparently it is always bad first thing on a Sunday morning.
submitted by travel_ali to TravelTripReviews [link] [comments]


2020.09.19 16:36 pmgeek Laserdiscs for sale

Here are the last of them, take your pick, $1.99 each plus shipping (media mail). I can fit about 5 in each mailer, so buy as many as you want and I'll combine into as few packages as possible to minimize shipping costs. These have been in storage for at least 15 years and I haven't watched any of them recently so can't comment on their condition. As such, they are being sold AS-IS. I've sold quite a few of these (over 100) recently and haven't heard any complaints back.

I accept PayPal (Friends & Family), Venmo or Zelle for payment

submitted by pmgeek to LaserDisc [link] [comments]


2020.09.19 08:12 24AMPER AMPER Questionaire! #2 - Funniest Moment in Fiction?

Comedy is a subjective stance, to be sure. Take it from me, someone who doesn't really laugh all that much. But there are things that are just friggin golden. Everyone has those moments, even the most stoic of them all. For me...
Monty Python and the Holdy Grail. No, not a specific scene. The entire movie.
This is my favorite movie of all-time, and it's all because of how hilarious it is. From the killer rabbit to "snuff it" to the intermission to the knights of the round table to the french knights, it's all just the funniest thing ever. If you haven't, watch this movie.
"Nothing bad ever happens to the Kennedys!"
Just... a car flipping for absolutely no reason. Also, the voice acting is golden. Also, politics.
"He's going over that cliff! AAAAAAAAAAA-"
Here's the stoory. Speed Racer, on the edge of a cliff, decided to jack off for two seconds. Then another racer, looking at Speed, says tht iconic line.. But at that moment, he looks ahead. A cliff. There, he realizes his final mistake. And as he screams one last time, a rope pulls his car dead right in the water as cheerful music plays. The comments of the video make it even more hilarious, too. All of the Speed Racer clips are gut busters, but this one in particular made my cheeks hurt with how hard I was laughing.
Now it's your turn.
submitted by 24AMPER to u/24AMPER [link] [comments]


2020.09.19 05:19 LKplayz25 Monty Python and the Holy Grail is full of memes, if you want you can watch it on Netflix, in the US at least

Monty Python and the Holy Grail is full of memes, if you want you can watch it on Netflix, in the US at least submitted by LKplayz25 to dndmemes [link] [comments]


2020.09.18 17:08 AlsoIHaveAGroupon What are your favorite comedy sketches that are NOT from the same old shows?

People link to or talk about comedy sketches here all the time, but they're almost always from SNL, Key & Peele, Chappelle's Show, Monty Python, or a few Mitchell & Webb bits that always come up (Numberwang, the gift shop sketch, football, Nazis, or in 2020 the Quiz Show Broadcast is everywhere for obvious reasons).
So none of those. What are your favorite sketches from other shows?
Either shows that were never very popular, or they're long enough ago that these whippersnappers today on reddit never saw them. Carol Burnett, The State, A Bit of Fry and Laurie, Stella, WKUK, Human GIant, Your Show of Shows, Important things with Demitri Martin, Kids in the Hall, I Think You Should Leave, Laugh-In, Jon Benjamin Has a Van, or Acceptable.TV if anyone remembers that one.
My favorites:
The Peter Serafinowicz Show (2007, BBC2) - Heads or Tails? - I only know this show from clips online, because I'm American, but we all know Peter Seafinowicz from something... the most recent live action Tick, frequently appearing in Edgar Wright/Simon Pegg stuff, John Wick 2, and voicing Darth Maul in The Phantom Menace. His sketch show only ran for seven episodes, so I gather it wasn't a massive success. It's definitely got an odd sensibility that wouldn't have a mass appeal, but some of the stuff on it is gold. (if you like this, you should also check out Look Around You, a strange but hilarious spoof of 1970s (season 1) and 80s (season 2) educational science programs). Heads or Tails? is a dead-on parody of the manufactured drama in Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? (which will probably be lost on you if you're not familiar with that show).
The Tracey Ullman Show (1987, Fox) - Special Skills - More famous for the animated shorts that spawned The Simpsons, this was one of the original shows on the Fox network, showcasing the talents of the British multi-hyphenate. I wasn't a huge fan of this show (I was 8 when it started, so a lot of the humor was lost on me), but this was great. The pacing is sllllooooow by today's standards, and 11 minutes is really long for a sketch, but I think it still works.
The Ben Stiller Show (1992, Fox) - Counting with Bruce Springsteen - This was a really short-lived sketch show on Fox with Stiller, Bob Odenkirk, Janeane Garofalo, Andy Dick, and Judd Apatow. It was on for like ten episodes, then won an Emmy for best variety program after it'd already been cancelled. The sketch is quick, but it's stuck with me for almost 30 years. Stiller did a lot of impressions, and while he's not that great at the voices, I was always impressed with the physicality of them. Most SNL celebrity impressions are just a voice, and they let a wig and makeup do all the rest, but Stiller's work on his show included a lot of facial expressions and body movement that often captured something about the subject.
The Dana Carvey Show (1996, ABC) - Waiters Nauseated by Food - This show's mostly famous now for the insane collection of talent in the writer's room. There's a good chance your favorite comedy shows of the 2000s/2010s had Dana Carvey Show writers on the staff if not the creators (US Office, 30 Rock, Parks and Rec, King of the Hill, Community, Moral Orel, Delocated), plus Louis CK, Stevphens Colbert and Carell, and Academy Award winner Charlie Kaufman. Despite all that talent, and a great timeslot, the show was a spectacular failure. Airing after family-friendly hit Home Improvement, they opened with an eight-nippled President Clinton breastfeeding babies, puppies, and kittens and all those parents and traditionalists couldn't change the channel fast enough.. But this sketch Stephen Colbert and Steve Carell is great. Colbert still uses the about-to-throw-up thing all the time.
TV Funhouse (2000, Comedy Central) - VH1's Great Leaders of History - George Washington - Robert Smigel did some animated shorts for SNL that got popular enough for Comedy Central to turn it into a show. The concept was that Doug and his animal friends would host and introduce short segments, except the Ani-Pals thought the host was a tool, so in every episode they would immediately ditch him to do their own thing. The show mixed the Ani-Pals' adventures, Doug's hosting without them, live action sketches, animated segments just like the SNL shorts, and even some guest contributions like surrealist cartoonist Michael Kupperman or Bob Odenkirk. The sketch is A Behind the Music spoof, which was timely-ish in 2000, but I think it works even if that reference is lost on you.
Mr. Show with Bob and David (1995, HBO) - Pallies - Bob Odenkirk (who has come up on this list a lot) and David Cross are the headliners, but this series also introduced viewers to people like Mary Lynn Rajskub, Jay Johnston, Scott Adsit, Sarah Silverman, Dino "Starburns" Stamatopoulos and Paul F. Tompkins. The sketches, and the creative segues to transition between them, reflected the alt-comedy roots of the cast and writing staff. Pallies is combination spoof of Goodfellas and joke about censoring movies for broadcast TV, and "mother father chinese dentist" will forever be stuck in my head.
submitted by AlsoIHaveAGroupon to television [link] [comments]


2020.09.17 15:31 leonortavora What's up with certain religions/cultures' obssession with virginity?

I watched an SNL sketch making fun of the greek gods yesterday and one of them, while introducing herself, highlighted that she's a virgin, which was apparently one of her biggest attributes.
And that made me think, how does that change anything about her? Why are there so many people equaling purity with "never had sex"???
And why is the mother of Jesus known as "Virgin Mary"? We literally adress her as "The Virgin" in lots of prayers... Why are christians so obssessed with her sexual status? Like the Monty Python put it: "How much more personal can you get?"
And even in my daily life that seems to be a huge concern... not whether or not people have had sex already, but whether or not they're still virgins, if that makes sense.
Why is there a word for it? You don't lose or gain anything when you have sex for the first time other than I guess... experience? Just like you don't lose anything when say, you drive a car for the first time, or fry an egg for the first time... Virginity is a false concept, and it only serves to ruin people's lives - specially women's - in the sense that everyday we hear people saying things like "our body is sacred and it's something we can't open up just for anyone" "pre-marital sex is a sin" (why the f*ck??? it's just sex) "you lose your purity or whatever once you lose your virginity" "you can't get it back".
Also, why are some men obssessed with having sex with "virgins"? Why did certain enchantments or religious rites in mediaval or ancient ages require "virgins"?? How does that change anything?
Why are we so obssessed with a barreer that doesn't exist?
submitted by leonortavora to NoStupidQuestions [link] [comments]


2020.09.16 21:39 Stormy8888 Recently rewatched Kung Fu Hustle and now I need recommendations for other GOOD and Funny comedies.

So, Kung Fu hustle is still hilarious, especially this knife scene. Now I want more. I've already seen these below (when I watch an Actor's stuff I tend to watch everything they do in that genre then expand out):-
Looking for recommendations for other great funny comedies I may have missed out on.
submitted by Stormy8888 to movies [link] [comments]


2020.09.15 09:01 kwpluckett Kwpluckett #79: Time Bandits (1981)

IMDB
Challenge started: 5/18/2020 Date Watched: 9/14/2020 Runtime: 1h56m Rating: PG Watched on: Blu-ray Rotten Tomatoes: %90 Imdb rating: 7.0 Genre: Fantasy/Adventure Directed by: Terry Gilliam 
Google synopsis:
Young history buff Kevin (Craig Warnock) can scarcely believe it when six dwarfs emerge from his closet one night. Former employees of the Supreme Being (Ralph Richardson), they've purloined a map charting all of the holes in the fabric of time and are using it to steal treasures from different historical eras. Taking Kevin with them, they variously drop in on Napoleon (Ian Holm), Robin Hood (John Cleese) and King Agamemnon (Sean Connery) before the Supreme Being catches up with them.
My thoughts:
Terry Gilliam is truly one of a kind. His films are so imaginative, artistically crafted, and complex. There are layers upon layers, sometimes metaphoric, sometimes physical, always intriguing.
Time Bandits is a film I've wanted to watch since I was a kid. I've always loved fantasy and adventure, and I had heard that this was a truly fantastical, surreal journey through history, time and space. I'm glad I finally watched it, as I loved every moment of it.
The costumes and scenery are amazingly crafted and heavily detailed. The attention to detail is tremendous. Even though you can tell wires and models (And some clay.) Were used, it is tangible, it is visceral, it is awesome. A number of the shots are unforgetable, the imagery just haunting. It is the stuff of dreams, and of nightmares.
The acting is top notch here. The characters are deep, and their relationships genuine. The main cast feels like a group of old friends. Their triumphs and failures relateable, their joys and sorrows palpable.
The writing is clearly heavily rooted in surreal comedy, absurdism and satire. It has the pinnings of Monty Python written all over it, without the trappings of the genre or the troupe. (Though perhaps it's less over the top?) Well, I love Monty Python, and I love this, but be aware, while this film is funny, it is not on the same level humor-wise as the former.
Anyways, if you like super imaginative surrealist art, dry Brithish humor, time traveling, history, or just want to watch a fun fantasy-adventure, watch Time Bandits. If you don't like these things, well umm, don't...
I'll give Time Bandits a 4 out of 5.
Find me on letterboxd
submitted by kwpluckett to 100movies365days [link] [comments]


2020.09.15 03:56 Dracorex_22 Sense of humor

Anyone else notice that their sense of humor just... isn’t there when they’re depersonalized? Like I can still tell jokes and I can tell when something is supposed to be funny, and even instinctively laugh. But I’m not actually feeling it. My sense of humor seemed to fall into two main categories: witty and clever humor, and stupid random dumb humor. Right now I can’t really feel either of those.
My sense of humor came from a lot of the clever cartoons I watched, other tv shows, books, games, movies, and a bit of social media. Specifically things like Gravity Falls, Doctor Who, Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, The Far Side, Portal, Spore and the Sims, Cards Against Humanity, Marvel Movies, Monty Python, Rick and Morty, Futurama, What We Do In The Shadows, Newgrounds games, a lot of animators and content creators on Youtube, Tumblr and Reddit shitposts, plenty of anime (specifically JoJo), playing DND, and inside jokes with my friends.
I think my clever, witty, chaotic humor is gone because I’m stuck in this weird overthinking existential mindset where I can’t connect or relate to things I usually do. I’m not immediately laughing at a joke based on some obscure reference like I used to, or finding it funny when someone cracks a joke like I usually do. Morbid or nihilistic jokes especially make me uncomfortable now, even though that used to be my favorite form of humor (again, Hitchhiker’s Guide). Violent humor like when a we beat up an enemy in DND or when something randomly explodes used to also be funny to me, although there were plenty of times when it also made me a bit uncomfortable. Random shitposts that also used to make me laugh just... don’t. And the mature jokes that go over people’s heads that I used to feel clever for getting just... aren’t doing anything for me. It seems as though I’m too seeing the world as messed up to find things funny like I used to. But I want to find things funny like I used to. I want to joke about things, quote memes with my friends, and just joke around.
I used to appreciate good comedic timing and when the delivery of a punchline is done well. But now I can’t find that. I used to find it funny when a show or comic referenced something else that I knew, but again, now I’m just not feeling it.
It’s especially hard because over quarantine I was planning on finally starting a comic I was working on because I finally got a new art tablet. If my sense of humor isn’t there, then I can’t exactly write my comic.
Other than my sense of humor, my other emotions towards characters don’t seem to be there either. It’s like I don’t get them anymore, I can’t relate to them anymore. If I can’t relate, then I can’t write. So I’m kinda stuck until I learn how to get rid of this stupid mental health bullshit and get back to my life.
submitted by Dracorex_22 to Depersonalization [link] [comments]


2020.09.14 17:27 FunnyPole [REQUEST] [STEAM] Castle Crashers

2nd attempt here.
Years ago I was playing a beat 'em up with friends on their xbox 360. We were loving the game and playing it everyday. I just remembered about this game today, because a YouTuber who made flash parodies of this game, came back after ~10 years. His videos remind me of Monty Python. This reignited the love I have for this game. Still remember the juggle combos.
Today, I don't have anything to do, because I have a cast and I can't go out. I am binge watching tv-shows. Watching movies. And playing games. Really would've been grateful for this game.
If I do get it, I'm gonna get all the achievements.
If you think the 15 dollars is too much, it costs 3 dollars on key sites, but they might not work. Also I wrote a lot of information about this game in the first post, almost made an essay lol. If you wanna know more about this game, read it, or watch some videos online. This game is 12 years old but it's hard to believe.
If you have the game, and if I will get it. We could play together.
I think the game has aged well, especially the graphics and so did the cartoonish humour.
Steam profile : https://steamcommunity.com/id/funnypole/
The game : https://store.steampowered.com/app/204360/Castle_Crashers/
submitted by FunnyPole to GiftofGames [link] [comments]


2020.09.13 04:41 PuzzleheadedSector2 Me when watched my first monty python movie. B4 that I had no clue where the templates were from.

Me when watched my first monty python movie. B4 that I had no clue where the templates were from. submitted by PuzzleheadedSector2 to MontyPythonMemes [link] [comments]


2020.09.13 03:18 Griy_the_Night_Guard Recently re-watched Monty Python and the Holy Grail; Decided to make a derpy comic out of my favorite part

Recently re-watched Monty Python and the Holy Grail; Decided to make a derpy comic out of my favorite part submitted by Griy_the_Night_Guard to MontyPythonMemes [link] [comments]


2020.09.11 23:53 Caelian I compared 2016 and 2020 polling. I think Biden is in pretty good shape -- today.

Note: I'm not supporting either Biden or Trump. I say "a plague on both their houses". I'll probably vote Green. But I do like graphs.
Here is my general opinion of polling in 2020 versus 2016. This is a turkey vulture view, soaring above the battle, watching and waiting for defeat so they can swoop down and have dinner. But I think that's appropriate this far out. A lot can happen between now and Nov 3rd, and the final results will depend highly on what happens in the swing states.
I think the best early indicator of the ultimate result is favorability versus unfavorability. People tend to vote for candidate they "like". Sometimes this is because of policy, but it's usually personality. Remember when Dubya won because he was the guy that people wanted to "have a beer with", whereas Al Gore gave the impression of being wooden and humorless? And then we had Mitt Romney, a guy you'd "like to throw a beer at".
In 2016, according to RealClearPolitics averages, both Hillary and Trump had negative net favorability, that is, more people had an unfavorable opinion than a favorable one. Trump always fared worse in 2016 before the election, but Hillary was still always negative, and sometimes they were close. The graphs jump around a lot, depending on the awfulness of the latest news for each candidate. Ultimately, a lot of people decided to stay home since they disliked both of them and had been bamboozled into thinking third party votes aren't socially acceptable.
In 2020, on the other hand, Biden is a lot more favorable than Hillary and it's a lot more stable. Biden has a long history of high favorability, largely IMO from that 2012 VP debate in which he clobbered Paul Ryan with snappy comebacks and a winning smile. The Democrats are doing everything they can to let voters believe Biden is still like that, and not a cranky senile old fart.
Trump 2020 is stuck solidly in unfavorable territory, and every day Trump does things to further cement that position.
So based on favorability, Biden is in much better shape than Trump. As many people like Biden as dislike him, as opposed to Trump and Hillary where so many people choose between dislike and loathing.
Favorability and unfavorability normally correlate closely with who gets the most votes, so let's look at national polling in 2020 versus 2016. Skip the first graph and look at the second. This is Biden versus Trump national polling average in 2020. Biden is always ahead, not by a lot, but consistently and it's pretty stable. The margin seems to track pretty well with favorability.
Now look at the bottom graph, which is Hillary versus Trump in 2016. Hillary is usually ahead, but the graph jumps around a lot and there are moments when Trump actually leads. That's not good for someone who is trying to show her "inevitability". Now Hillary was usually safely ahead, but unfortunately for Hillary, Election Day happened shortly after her numbers dipped because voters suddenly became "interested in her damn e-mails" when the FBI discovered her e-mails on Anthony Weiner's laptop.
A few days before the election, the FBI determined that the e-mails were the same as ones they had already examined, but at that point the damage was done. The common wisdom was that if the "election was about Trump" then Hillary would win, but if the "election was about Hillary" then Trump would win.
So I say Biden -- today -- is in pretty good shape. Many people like to vote for "the winner", and if a candidate is consistently ahead in the polls he looks like a winner. If a candidate is bouncing around in the polls, she does not look like a winner and if you can't stand her then the other guy has a good shot -- even if you can't stand him either. Then it becomes matter of turnout, and Republican voters are a lot more reliable.
Edit: I highly recommend TheRazorX's post which demonstrates that most voters "cannot tell the difference between Whizzo butter and a dead crab". (H/T Monty Python)
submitted by Caelian to WayOfTheBern [link] [comments]


2020.09.10 20:17 dijana_cmar Monty Python counterpart movies

I watched The Naked Gun (1988) last night and for some reason I felt like it was the american counterpart to Monty Python. Since Americans usually take some British TV show or movie and make their own adaptation like The Office UK -> The Office US, or Shameless UK -> Shameless US years later. Of course not just cleanly the american version because they are different in some ways but I feel like it was curated for americans with american humour just like how Monty Python had British humour. Does anyone else kinda think so too? Does anyone else have any other movies they know that kinda fall under this?
submitted by dijana_cmar to montypython [link] [comments]


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10 essential Monty Python episodes to watch now that the ...

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  9. Top 10 Monty Python's Flying Circus Moments - YouTube

Monty Python Ministry of Silly Walks Dutch Subs Voor Bieke ! Argument by Monty Python with some scenes cut And Now for Something Completely Different Released: 1971.09.28 Written by Monty Python Directed by Ian MacNaughton Distributed by Columbia Pictures Starring... Like Tim and the Killer Rabbit we were warned about the dangers in regards to reopening to early in regards to COVID. But did we listen? No, it's just a harm... For 7 years you YouTubers have been ripping us off, taking tens of thousands of our videos and putting them on YouTube. Now the tables are turned. It's time ... 'Monty Python' no seu melhor sketch de sempre! Reparem na soberba interpretação de Eric Idle! (transcreve-se o diálogo para os mais encerados de ouvido)... And now for something completely different... Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we're counting down our picks for the top 10 Monty Python TV moments. Speci... Anecdotally, I once found myself IN this pet shop. It was in the Caledonian Road, North London. I wandered in - I was passing and needed something or other -... holy grail witch scene I didn't make this obviously, it's made by Monty Python. Love them! I do.